[skratchdot.]

The other month I ran into an issue when trying to run a simple update statement on a table in SQL Server 2005. The error I was receiving was:

Cannot insert duplicate key row in object ‘MyProductView’ with unique index ‘IXCL_MyProductView’

NOTE: I’ve changed the names of the views/tables/columns that were actually used, but you should get the idea.

The update statement that threw the error looked like this:

UPDATE Products SET active = 1 WHERE id = 200

MyProductView was basically just a way to join a few of the product related tables (ie: Sizes, Colors, Inventory, etc).

The index on MyProductView that was causing the constraint violation looked something like this:

CREATE UNIQUE CLUSTERED INDEX IXCL_MyProductView ON MyProductView
(
	product_id,
	color_id,
	size_id,
	inventory_id,
	currency_id
}

Notice the active flag/column is not in the clustered index (so updating that column on the Products table should not change a row in my view that would violate the unique constraint above). Also, the active column was not in any of the join clauses for the MyProductView, so no rows should’ve been added or deleted from the view after running the update statement.

To confirm the validity of the IXCL_MyProductView constraint, I could run:

SELECT
	product_id, color_id, size_id, inventory_id, currency_id, COUNT(1) AS confirmConstraint
FROM
	MyProductView
GROUP BY
	product_id, color_id, size_id, inventory_id, currency_id

As long as the IXCL_MyProductView constraint was in place, the confirmConstraint column could only have a value of 1.

I could not figure out why running:

UPDATE Products SET active = 1 WHERE id = 200

would cause a problem. If the query would complete successfully, the constraint would still be valid. In fact, I could run the same query in production just fine. Also, the other developers could run the query just fine on their local DBs. I was the only one who was running into this constraint violation (and I had the same data in my database as the other databases had). After bringing this up with our DBA, he had no idea why the constraint violation would be occur.
I wondered if I needed to wrap the UPDATE statement in a TRANSACTION COMMIT block, but our DBA said I shouldn’t have to.

After thinking about it for a minute, he asked what version of SQL Server 2005 I was using. It turned out I was not running the same service pack level as the other developers (and what was in production).

I was running “SQL Server 2005 - Developer’s Edition (9.0 RTM)”. I then upgraded to Service Pack 2: “SQL Server 2005 - Developer’s Edition (9.0 SP2)”, and the issue disappeared. I was able to run my UPDATE statement without error.

Tagged with: DatabaseSQLSQL Server 2005


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